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Artist's Statement

 

David Kempton
PixSilver Images

 

pixsilver.com
kempton@pixsilver.com

Overview

My Inspirations


Truth and Beauty, and Energy in All Things

I believe that, like all Fine Art, photography can challenge and inform the intellect and the spirit at the same time as it delights the eye. I have always found echoes of human emotions and longings in natural and urban settings. My current projects include exploring our effects on the natural environment, particularly through the electrical grid; how we really view landscape; and how we understand couples.

Minor White | Edward Weston | Richard Avedon | Margaret Bourke-White | W Eugene Smith | Dorothea Lange | Edward Burtynsky | Diane Arbus | Paul Strand | Lewis Hine | Shin Sugino | Man Ray | Harry Callahan | André Kertész | Group of Seven (+) | Abstract Impressionists | Peggy Stevens | Margaret Atwood | Roo Borson | George Bowering | Susan Musgrave | Christopher Dewdney | A K Dewdney | Heisenberg | Existentialism | Elizabeth May | Bill McKibben | Naomi Klein | Leah Buechley | William Gibson | Beethoven | Douglas Cardinal |

Many cameras, few Photographers


Few people are actually familiar with what goes into making a photograph, and what is needed to appreciate one.

At the moment of creation, the photographer must choose the right framing of the right objects, with the right lighting, at the right moment. The exposure time, f-stop and ISO setting all must be chosen for their proper effects (for example, blurred motion, out-of-focus background and graininess, respectively).

A multitude of things can be adjusted in the processing – contrast, brightness, colour balance… it’s really easy to overdo it.

In printing, the paper must be matched to the image, with an understanding of how the paper’s characteristics will affect the printed image. The camera, monitor and printer must all be matched

When you look at a photograph, consider the photographer’s choices of subject, framing, lighting, proximity, flatness (or bending) of the field of view, colour, sharpness (or blurring) of focus, depth of field, graininess, brightness, contrast, motion, paper texture and colour, layering or juxtaposition, and so on. Really look.

Then ask – Does this photograph make me see and think differently

How I've
              been described